Mrs Kirstin Jackson RHAD

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Kirstin has been working within the private hearing sector since 2003 but qualified as a Hearing Aid Audiologist from De Montfort University in Leicester in 2009.
For the last 9 years Kirstin has worked at one of the large high street providers of private hearing aids where she has built up a reputation of being a very well respected, very caring audiologist who maintains an exceedingly high standard of professionalism and expertise.

Extraordinary Story illustrating the benefits of Oticon Opn

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From Nuala, a regular contributor:

 

“So how cool/not cool is this?
I was at the gym. I went to get a paper towel to wipe down my exercise machine.
My phone was on the machine I was using.
My back was turned 2 seconds and my iPhone was gone! … but the music was still playing through my hearing aids.
Someone had taken it.
When the music stopped (the Bluetooth signal had moved out of range), I ran downstairs and I saw this guy in reception had it.
I challenged him straight away. He said it was his but I said it couldn’t be, because I had it linked up to my hearing aids.
Luckily he owned up and I got it back. I don’t think I would have noticed, or got it back if I hadn’t been wearing my hearing aids and the music had then stopped.
I think he backed down quickly, as he also felt sorry for the fact that I had hearing aids too!
Idiot”
Nuala,
16.08.2018

Tympanometry to measure ear drum and middle ear function is now STANDARD

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We are proud to introduce this test as a free add-on to our wonderful ‘free trial consultation’ which bears no charge. Everyone will benefit from this very interesting and informative test.

A sealed probe is placed at the entrance to the ear canal and a very slight airflow is emitted. The impedance (resistance) of the ear drum and middle ear is measured within a few seconds. This can be very useful in determining the nature of a hearing loss and informing our audiologist as to what hearing aid will best suit that individual.

We believe that we are the ONLY private audiologist in the locality to offer tympanometry as a free service* (*at our discretion).

We look forward to seeing you.

Mrs. Bradshaw is delighted

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Jenny had not really come to terms with her hearing loss when she came to visit us. She felt that hearing aids were cumbersome, ineffective and that they would randomly fall out of the ear.

Through our evaluation process, Mrs Bradshaw was able to take her new system away in holiday (with some good advice). She says she wouldn’t have had the confidence to try if she’d had to pay up front. Luckily, for everyone concerned, she was amazed with the benefits and extremely grateful to us for ‘sorting her out’

 

Sammy King

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Recent visit to R. J Donnan Hearing Care:
“Right from the start Rob made my wife and I feel very relaxed and confident of a very professional service. After my hearing was found to be ‘in need of improvement’ Rob went through several options with me and placed his recommended hearing aids in place. We chatted for some time until I was confident enough to leave, wearing the hearing aids on trial. No payment was requested at this time. Rob made a follow up appointment for me for the following week. On my return, and only when I was totally happy with every detail, was payment required.
Will be going back next week for the first of future follow up appointments. As I work in the music business it is essential that my hearing has to be as good as it can be and I am pleased to say that I am more than satisfied.”

Sammy King
(wrote ‘Penny Arcade’, as sung by Roy Orbison)
22.05.2018

Opn changed my life.

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“I’ve worn hearing aids for more than 40 years (since I was a toddler) so I thought I knew what I wanted: better hearing, no fuss. I got that, but I also got a lot more. Here’s how.
My hearing loss is more complicated than most, because it comes with a progressive loss of vision. With less than 5% of my sight remaining, I need to make the most of what I hear. Especially since I’m juggling three primary-age children, a guide dog, freelance writing/editing work and volunteer activities. I need to know when I drop something!
My old hearing aids were falling apart. I needed new ones. The latest technology is only available privately, but it’s pricey and I didn’t want to make an expensive mistake. So, I stalled, until one day I came across RJD Hearing Care’s advertisement offering free trials. They also gave the option of home visits, which are much more manageable for me, and that tipped the balance. I decided to give them a try.
I’ve met a lot of audiologists, so I felt sure I’d spot a scam. As soon as I met Rob, my doubts receded. He knew his stuff and his straightforward manner meant we could have a direct conversation with no hard-sell. Quite the opposite: I was let loose to try out a pair of Oticon iPhone-compatible hearing aids with no financial commitment. This is ground-breaking and makes such a difference: trying hearing aids in a soundproof office (or, in my case, my own kitchen) isn’t a guide to how they’ll perform out and about.
I loved the new aids. But disaster struck a couple of weeks later. Rob returned to fine-tune the settings and a software crash combined with manufacturer issues meant one aid was unusable for several weeks. But Rob came through for me: he replaced those aids with the latest top-of-the-range Oticon model at exactly the same price. And no bill yet: I could try them out first. I even took them abroad on holiday.
The sound was excellent: clearer, smoother, and more distinct than ever before. No feedback, either. Best of all, though, is the new iPhone-compatible technology. My phone streams via Bluetooth directly to my hearing aids. No one else need hear it (unless I choose to change the settings and let them). It makes a huge difference to the clarity of the sound. Phone calls are much easier. Audiobooks, podcasts and music are all suddenly accessible, which they never have been before. As a voracious reader, losing the ability to read print was very hard for me, but now through technology I can still read on the backlit high-contrast screen of my iPhone X, and listen through Bluetooth streaming. It’s a great joy.
A world of sound has opened up. Because there’s no extra equipment; just my hearing aids and my phone, both of which I have on me nearly all the time, I listen to audiobooks or podcasts in every spare moment: emptying the washing machine, walking home, waiting in a queue. There’s no dead time any more. I even watched 58 children each perform the same poem at a drama festival with a beatific smile on my face while actually listening to War and Peace, and no one around me knew (until now …) Sometimes, my husband breaks off conversation, gives me a suspicious look, and asks if I’m listening to something else. (No, darling, of course not, tell me more about your day. Ahem.)
Many blind or partially-sighted people use specially-designed satnav apps to help them find their way about. These have never been an option for me as I couldn’t hear the instructions clearly. Now I can. My guide dog and I trekked off to an unfamiliar location with me listening to the new voice in my head (it’s real, honestly). Yes, the journey took an hour and a half when it should have taken twenty minutes, but we got there, which wouldn’t have been possible before. I didn’t celebrate (I was too busy apologising for being late) but the app obviously thought I should because it helpfully pointed out there was a pub 50 yards to the left. Since it was only ten a.m., it’s just as well that no one else could hear.
That’s only the beginning. I’ve bought a Bluetooth connector that lets the TV stream directly into my hearing aids, with separate volume controls to the sound going into the main room. So my husband can finally turn the TV down to a level that doesn’t blast his ears, and I get an amazing cinema-sound experience that means I don’t need to be glued to the subtitles. Next on my list is a Bluetooth doorbell that streams via my iPhone to murmur discreetly into my ear, Jeeves-style, that Someone Is At The Door, Milady. (Possibly it won’t actually say Milady, but I’m sure that’s the general tenor.)
Since childhood, I’ve thought that hearing aids lacked imagination. People with hearing loss want a lot more than a glorified ear-trumpet. Now, at last, the superpowers are arriving.”

Penny,

Harrogate,
11.05.2018